Inicio > Mis eListas > lea > Mensajes

 Índice de Mensajes 
 Mensajes 3588 al 3617 
AsuntoAutor
XII JORNADA DE CON Maria Pa
...libertad alimen Jorge Hi
Invitación al I Cu frebol
Protest lack of te Jorge Hi
Información impor Fundació
Re: XII JORNADA DE Ing. Osc
Fw: si te gusta ir Edinson
Fw: SARS Edinson
Re: Fw: si te gust AnaChauc
Invitación Confere Maria Pa
Fw: VI BOLETIN - Jaime E.
Fw: Transgénicos a Jaime E.
Open letter to CIF Sociedad
Open letter to CIF Sociedad
Fw: REDESMA - Bole Jaime E.
gigantesca criat Jaime E.
III Curso Internac Jaime E.
DNA y la evolució Jaime E.
Seminario Agricul Jaime E.
A proposito de la Jaime E.
LA BIOTECNOLOGÍA Y Jaime E.
XXVII Congreso Amb Jorge Hi
El Cloro es uno de Jorge Hi
Declaración Santa Jorge Hi
Re: Transgénicos a Jorge Hi
Fw: El neoliberali Edinson
Encuentro en Defen Jorge Hi
Evento en Mérida Jaime E.
SEGURIDAD ALIMENTA Jaime E.
V Curso Manejo de Maria Pa
 << 30 ant. | 30 sig. >>
 
Lista Ecologia y Ambiente - VZLA
Página principal    Mensajes | Enviar Mensaje | Ficheros | Datos | Encuestas | Eventos | Mis Preferencias

Mostrando mensaje 3997     < Anterior | Siguiente >
Responder a este mensaje
Asunto:[LEA-Venezuela] Open letter to CIFOR (Center for International Forestry Research)
Fecha:Viernes, 4 de Julio, 2003  11:14:52 (-0400)
Autor:Sociedad de Amigos en defensa de la Gran Sabana-AMIGRANSA <amigrans @........ve>


Open letter to CIFOR (Center for International Forestry Research)
From: Oilwatch and World Rainforest Movement

To: CIFOR Director David Kaimowitz

Re: CIFOR study strengthens oil exploitation and mining


The Oilwatch Network and the World Rainforest Movement are deeply surprised
and shocked by a CIFOR study which appears to give green credentials to two
activities that are at the core of deforestation and forest degradation: oil
and mining. The study ("Oil, Macroeconomics and Forests: Assessing the
Linkages", by Sven Wunder and William D. Sunderlin), constitutes one of the
worst examples of a biased, simplistic and unscientific study.



The authors show a total lack of understanding about forest ecosystems and
on how oil and mining impact on them and on their inhabitants. The authors
fail to understand that a forest is not simply an area covered by trees and
that the presence or absence of tree cover is but part of the equation. A
forest is an entire ecosystem, including people, fauna, flora, water, air
and soils. All these components are severely degraded by oil activities
(people are killed, repressed or expelled; local animal and plant species
are severely impacted and some driven to extinction; water courses suffer
pollution, siltation and alteration; the air becomes poisoned and so on).
However, the authors of the study only look at questionable data about
forest cover to "prove" that oil and mining serve to conserve forests.



The authors also fail to identify oil activities as a major direct and
underlying cause of deforestation and forest degradation. They don't mention
that even before a single barrel of oil is produced, prospection activities
result in extensive deforestation and in the violation of local peoples'
rights. It also results in facilitating access to forests by other actors
through the opening of roads, a process which accelerates as oil production
increases. The major underlying causes of deforestation and forest
degradation (land tenure issues, macroeconomic policies, sectoral policies,
external debt servicing, among many other) are either ignored or diluted,
putting most of the blame of deforestation on agriculture and livestock
production carried out by local dwellers.



The study's conclusions constitute a show case of unscientific manipulation
of information. In spite of the fact that the findings in the six countries
analysed do not support the authors' hypothesis, they "adjust" them to
achieve their aim. They are even forced to divide Venezuela into two
different countries --pre and post World War II Venezuela-- simply because
the latter proved their hypothesis wrong. Using their same information,
anyone can reach exactly the opposite (equally biased, simplistic and
unscientific) conclusion. Were the hypothesis to be that oil and mining in
no way help to conserve forests, the "conclusions" would be (using the same
wording as the authors) that Ecuador (and post World War II Venezuela) are
"confirmative cases in absolute terms", that Papua New Guinea is a case of
"relative confirmation" as well as Cameroon, "though a more hesitant one",
while Gabon and pre World War II Venezuela "were the only cases outright
rejecting the core hypothesis."



The authors' solution to the forest crisis is in line with their analytical
approach: take people out and let oil and mining companies take care of the
forests. The absurdity of this approach is best visualized in their
"ten-component so-called 'Improved Gabonese Recipe' for achieving maximum
forest conservation". In that respect, it is more than sufficient to
mention --with no need to comment-- their point 8 ("Force rural people to
settle in concentrated roadside agglomerations"), point 9 ("Waste your
agricultural budget on agro-industrial 'white elephants' and ignore
smallholders") and point 10 ("Nourish a rent-seeking environment in which
few people find it worth while to produce") to declare this study a
demential approach to forest conservation.



Within that framework, the authors are finally able to prove that reality
does not really exist, by concluding that "Oil production in itself is a
negligible direct source of deforestation, compared to national land use.
Its direct degradation impacts are variable, and have in many cases declined
over time through better practices. The same is true of mining [which is not
even addressed in the study] though its effects can be more significant:
there are some examples of severe forest loss caused by mining."



For people subjected to oil and mining this study is not only science
fiction; it is a mockery of science. We deeply regret that what many people
have until now considered a serious research institution such as CIFOR is
giving this study its institutional backing. The oil and mining industries
will be extremely happy, but this is a very sad day for forests and
particularly for forest peoples struggling against what the authors have
never had to live with: the social and environmental destruction that these
activities entail.



Further strengthening the oil and mining companies, CIFOR is now publicizing
another publication (not available through its web page) obviously in line
with the one we comment above and written by one of it authors (Sven
Wunder). Both CIFOR and the author of "Oil Wealth and the Fate of the
Forest: A Comparison of Eight Tropical Countries" perceive the implications
of the study. While CIFOR feels obliged to state that it "does not receive
funding from oil or mining companies", the author says that
"environmentalists should not misinterpret this report". However, if this
book reflects the same findings as the one we comment (and the CIFOR news
release on this publication show that this assumption is correct), then it
will not be a question of "misinterpreting" anything, but of making CIFOR
and the author responsible for providing the already extremely powerful oil
and mining companies with a very useful tool for greening their image while
destroying forests and forest peoples' lives.



Esperanza Martínez

Oilwatch Network

tegantai@...



Ricardo Carrere

World Rainforest Movement

rcarrere@...




COMENTARIO DE OILWATCH
(propuesta inicial para su discusión, corrección y
contribuciones)

Resulta sorprendente que se publique un articulo con tal desconocimiento de
los hechos y que se hagan afirmaciones tan absurdas como que las actividades
petroleras y mineras pueden contribuir a la conservación de los bosques.

 Establecer la relación de la conservación con actividades extractivas,
porque estas desalientan la agricultura es además de absurdo, una premisa
falsa.  La enfermedad holandesa que el artículo identifica como el fenómeno
que determinaría este incentivo a la conservación, provoca en la realidad
aumentar la exportación de materias primas, el desarrollo de actividades con
altos pasivos ambientales y debilitar las políticas ambientales y de
conservación.

 Es audaz llegar a estas conclusiones a partir de los  casos  de Cameroon,
Ecuador, Gabon, Papua New Guinea,  Venezuela,  Indonesia, Mexico y Nigeria,
pues de todos estos casos hay evidencias de los impactos que ha tenido el
modelo petrolero sobre los bosques, la salud y la economía de esos países.

 Las actividades extractivas destruyen directa los bosques.  Estas
actividades  requieren de espacios limpios (sin vegetación)  necesitan de
madera para  su infraestructura, requieren de agua.. Los intereses de la
industria petrolera se  articulan con intereses nacionales y extranjeros de
³aprovechamiento de la madera³, es decir empresas madereras que utilizan las
carreteras construidas por las industrias extractivas para sacar la madera,
que inducen (y presionan)  a los campesinos empobrecidos a talar sus
bosques. Provocan endeudamiento externo que se convierte en la razón para
ampliar las fronteras de extracción de estos recursos y finalmente provoca
violencia, guerras e invasiones., todas estas causas subyacentes de la
deforestación.

 Para analizar el impacto de estas actividades sobre los bosques  hay que
diferenciar las actividades offshore, con aquellas localizadas en savanas y
las de los bosques propiamente dichas.  Obviamente si la actividad es en el
mar no provoca deforestación, pero tampoco conservación.

 Cuando se habla de conservación de bosques no se puede desconocer el
problemas de contaminación del agua.  De la misma manera que no se puede
hablar de conservación de bosques sino se toma en cuenta a las poblaciones
tradicionalmente ligadas a los bosques. En el caso del Ecuador, se ha
deforestado más de un millón de hectáreas, se han extinguido dos pueblos
indígenas, 8 más son ahora minorías indígenas con territorios fragmentados y
contaminados. Todos los ríos de la zona petrolera están contaminados y los
niveles de contaminación son una amenaza para la sobrevivencia de las
personas y por supuesto de sus ecosistemas.

  Por cada galón que se extrae se calcula que por lo menos se derrama uno en
desechos. Solamente las aguas de formación contienen concentraciones de
sales de sodio de entre 150.000 a 180.000 ppm (partes por millón), es decir,
éstas aguas son hasta 5 veces más salada que el agua del mar que tiene
35.000 ppm.

Por cada pozo que se abre, se deforesta por lo menos 1 hectárea., a esto hay
que añadir la deforestación que provocan los ductos, las carreteras, las
estacionesS

 Una referencia ilustrativa a la magnitud de la contaminación de las aguas
es
la presencia de  PAH, (hidrocarburos Aromáticos Policíclicos),, que tienen
relación directa con el cáncer,  efectos tóxicos en la reproducción,
mutaciones e irritación de la piel. En los Estados Unidos,  la EPA no acepta
presencia en aguas de consumo humano y en el Ecuador se admite una cantidad
0,0003 ppm (equivalente a 3 nanogramos /litro.   Sin embargo en  la Amazonía
se han encontrado lugares como  el campo Sacha donde los análisis de aguas
presentan concentraciones de 405.634 nanogramos/litro  en el agua de consumo
humano, lo que supone un riesgo de cancer en 14 personas de cada 100.

 Pretender que esta actividad contribuye a la conservación es desconocer el
dolor de los millares de personas que sufren de cáncer que han perdido sus
tierras y que han muerto por culpa directa del petróleo

 Finalmente el articulo es mal intencionado al plantear que es posible
superar el grado de intervención de las industrias extractivas con buenas
prácticas

 La buena práctica es un tema de publicidad y relaciones públicas, las
empresas, en la practica hacen todo lo contrario y renuncian a ser
controladas. Expropian tierras, contaminan, afectan los derechos colectivos,
responsabilizan a los campesinos, al ecoturismo, a la población de todos los
problemas que se hacen visibles.
La dificultad de controlar a las empresas es común en todo el mundo. Donde
hay estas actividades hay  concentración de poder y de dinero y por lo tanto
corrupción. Hace un par de semanas la Agencia de Protección ambiental de los
Estados Unidos emitió una nueva norma que dice que en los nuevos proyectos
debe haber un plan para analizar las aguas de escorrentía, pero lo insólito
es que  las petroleras están  exentas de esta norma.

 Para las compañías petroleras es fácil decir lo correcto, y actuar de otra
forma, pueden lograr legislaciones favorables, impunidad y hasta una imagen
verde construida con artículos como este.


Comentario de Ricardo Carrere del WRM

This CIFOR publication is one of the worst examples I have ever
seen of a simplistic, biased and unscientific study. It shows a
total lack of understanding about forest ecosystems and on how
oil and mining impact on them and on their inhabitants. Even
before a single barrel of oil is produced, prospection activities
result in extensive deforestation, but this is not even mentioned
in the study, which only addresses oil exploitation. But the
latter is itself a major cause of forest degradation. The authors
fail to understand that a forest is not composed only of trees;
it is an entire ecosystem, including people, fauna, flora, water,
air and soils. All these components are severely degraded by oil
activities (people are killed or expelled, local animal and plant
species are driven to extinction, water is severely polluted,
water courses suffer siltation and alteration, the air becomes
poisoned and so on). However, the authors of the study only look
at questionable data about forest cover to "prove" that oil and
mining serve to conserve forests.

The authors' solution to the forest crisis is in line with their
analytical approach: take people out and let oil and mining
companies take care of the forests. The absurdity of this
approach is best visualized in their "ten-component so-called
'Improved Gabonese Recipe' for achieving maximum forest
conservation". In that respect, it is more than sufficient to
mention --with no need to comment-- their point 8 ("Force rural
people to settle in concentrated roadside agglomerations"), point
9 ("Waste your agricultural budget on agro-industrial 'white
elephants' and ignore smallholders") and point 10 ("Nourish a
rent-seeking environment in which few people find it worth while
to produce") to declare this study a demential approach to forest
conservation.

The study's conclusions arise from manipulating the data that
doesn't support the authors' basic hypothesis (for instance by
dividing Venezuela into a pre-World War II and a post-World War
II country as if they were two altogether different countries)
and from failing to include or diluting the major direct and
underlying causes of deforestation and forest degradation (land
tenure issues, macroeconomic policies, external debt servicing,
among many other).

Within that framework, the authors are finally able to
demonstrate that reality does not really exist, by concluding
that "Oil production in itself is a negligible direct source of
deforestation, compared to national land use. Its direct
degradation impacts are variable, and have in many cases declined
over time through better practices. The same is true of mining
[which is not even addressed in the study] though its effects can
be more significant: there are some examples of severe forest
loss caused by mining."

For people subjected to oil and mining this study is not only
science fiction; it is a mockery of science. I deeply regret that
what I have until now considered a serious research institution
such as CIFOR is giving this study its institutional backing. The
oil and mining industries will be extremely happy, but this is a
very sad day for forests and particularly for forest peoples
struggling against what the authors have never had to live with:
the social and environmental destruction that these activities
entail.

Ricardo Carrere
International Coordinator
World Rainforest Movement


fwd:
RED ALERTA PETROLERA-ORINOCO OILWATCH

 e-mail:  amigrans@... , amigransa_oilwatch@...




En el mes de agosto de 1996, la organización ambientalista AMIGRANSA-
Sociedad de Amigos en defensa de la Gran Sabana, promueve  la creación  en
Venezuela de la RED ALERTA PETROLERA (Orinoco-Oilwatch), filial venezolana
de OILWATCH, organización internacional de resistencia a la actividad
petrolera en los trópicos y vigilancia de los impactos ambientales y
sociales de dicha actividad, nacida en Quito, Ecuador, donde se encuentra la
Secretaria Internacional de Oilwatch. En la RED ALERTA PETROLERA, hemos
considerado prioritario por su urgencia y su gravedad, solicitar una
MORATORIA a la actividad petrolera en áreas de alta fragilidad ambiental y
social; realizar el estudio de la problemática de la zona Delta del Orinoco/
Golfo de Paria en el extremo oriente del país, en la desembocadura del Río
Orinoco, hábitat de la étnia indígena Warao; las secuelas de la explotación
de petróleo, carbón y gas en el Edo. Zulia, el resultado de las
'asociaciones estratégicas' en la faja petrolífera del Orinoco y la deuda
ecológica. Sus voceros forman parte de grupos ecologistas, de pueblos
indigenas, instituciones académicas y de investigación, grupos defensores de
los derechos humanos, grupos de pescadores y de otras poblaciones locales
afectadas por los impactos de mega-proyectos petroleros, gasiferos y
petroquímicos.



Miembros de la RED ALERTA PETROLERA (ORINOCO OILWATCH)



Sociedad de Amigos en Defensa de la Gran Sabana, AMIGRANSA, Grupo de Estudio
Mujer y Ambiente GEMA, Sociedad Naturista de Venezuela, Fundamat,
Representantes de Comunidades Indígenas, Red de Mujeres Indigenas WARAO,
Federación de Juntas Ambientales-MOSIN , Grupo Ecológico de Bolívar GREBO,
Jardín Botánico de Tucupita, , ECO XXI, Vicaria Derecho y Justicia,
Fundación Casa del Trabajador de Sucre, Sociedad Conservacionista de Sucre,
Comité de Solidaridad con EL HORNITO , Frente en Defensa de la Sierra de
Perija, Frente Ecologista del Zulia, Cinemovil Wuayra y otras personalidades
relevantes del área del petróleo, antropología, biología, derecho,
agricultura y pesca .







_______________________________________________________________________
Visita nuestro patrocinador:
~^~^~^~^~^~^~^~^~^~^~^~^~^~^~^~^~^~^~^~^~^~^~^~^~^~^~^~^~^~^~^~^~^~^~^~^~
         ¿Deseas conocer a alguien al otro lado del mundo...?
                ¿...al otro lado de la esquina?
                  ¿Deseas hacer nuevos amigos?
  !!Conoce la mayor red de contactos y amistades hispana en Internet!!
Haz clic aquí -> http://elistas.net/ml/117/
~^~^~^~^~^~^~^~^~^~^~^~^~^~^~^~^~^~^~^~^~^~^~^~^~^~^~^~^~^~^~^~^~^~^~^~^~



[Adjunto no mostrado: Oil Wealth and Forests Abstrac.doc (application/msword) ]