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Asunto:[LEA-Venezuela] Importante noticia forestal: descubren organismos con celulosa y sin deforestar nada
Fecha:Lunes, 22 de Octubre, 2001  10:35:57 (-0400)
Autor:Interfaz Amazonica <interfaz @.....net>

Waoo!! Proforca, la CVG y el gobierno seguro esconden esta noticia
--Trastor

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Importante noticia forestal: descubren como dejar de cortar arboles para
obtener celulosa

La celulosa en un nuevo grupo de organismos puede ser una nueva fuente
prometedora de produccion industrial de esta sustancia y podria
ebentualmente eliminar la necesidad de cortar arboles para madera o pulpa,
dicen los investigadores de la Universidad de Texas en Austin.

Para las imagenes vea:
http://www.botany.utexas.edu/facstaff/facpages/mbrown/cyano/

El manuscrito en ingles puede ser bajado aqui:

http://www.plantphysiol.org/cgi/content/full/127/2/529


----------

Title:   Researchers at UT Austin Announce Discovery That Could Some Day
Eliminate Need to Harvest Trees for Wood or Pulp

Summary:     AUSTIN, Texas, Oct 19, 2001 (ASCRIBE NEWS via COMTEX) --
Cellulose in a new group of organisms may be a promising new resource for
the industrial production of the substance and could eventually eliminate
the need to harvest trees for wood or pulp, researchers at The University of
Texas at Austin say.

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Source:  AScribe Newswire
Date:  10/19/2001 22:47
Price:  Free
Document Size:  Very Short (less than 1 page)
Document ID:  FD20011019960000057
Subject(s):  Mts; Arable; Biology; Cotton; Fertilizer; Flax; Genetics; Gold;
Industrial; Nitrate; Plant; Products; Research; Species; Texas; Utah; Water




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Researchers at UT Austin Announce Discovery That Could Some Day Eliminate
Need to Harvest Trees for Wood or Pulp

----------------------------------------------------------------------------
----

Story Filed: Friday, October 19, 2001 10:47 PM EST

AUSTIN, Texas, Oct 19, 2001 (ASCRIBE NEWS via COMTEX) -- Cellulose in a new
group of organisms may be a promising new resource for the industrial
production of the substance and could eventually eliminate the need to
harvest trees for wood or pulp, researchers at The University of Texas at
Austin say.

The discovery of cellulose biosynthesis in nine species of cyanobacteria, or
blue-green algae, also may be the source of the genetic material used for
cellulose biosynthesis in present-day plants such as trees and cotton.

The findings of the researchers, who include David R. Nobles, Dr. Dwight K.
Romanovicz and Dr. R. Malcolm Brown Jr., have been published in the October
issue of Plant Physiology. Nobles, lead author of the paper, is a third-year
graduate student with Brown, who holds the Johnson & Johnson Centennial
Chair in Plant Biology, in the Section of Molecular Genetics and
Microbiology in the School of Biological Sciences. Romanovicz is a research
associate in the Brown laboratory.

Blue-green algae are among the most ancient of today's living organisms and
have been in existence for more than 2.8 billion years. Fossils of forms
that resemble cyanobacteria have been dated as far back as 3.5 billion
years. Cellulose is a biopolymer that plants use as the primary building
block for their cell walls. Cellulose is important economically because it
is the major source of such significant and useful plant products as wood,
cotton and flax.

"Although cellulose biosynthesis among the cyanobacteria has been suggested
previously, we present the first conclusive evidence, to our knowledge, of
the presence of cellulose in these organisms," Nobles said.

Brown said an exciting future possibility based on this discovery could be
industrial production of cellulose from cyanobacteria.

He said, "if industrial production from this source were to be achieved, we
might never need to harvest trees again for wood or pulp. In the future, we
could possibly use cyanobacterial cellulose."

Brown said cyanobacteria inhabit vast, incredibly diverse environments
ranging from freshwater lakes and ponds, to hypersaline water, to deserts
where rainfall never has been recorded. Cyanobacteria are common in the dry
valleys of Antarctica and can live embedded in the surface of rocks. Some
cyanobacteria do not require fresh water, nitrate-based fertilizer or even
arable land to grow and flourish.

From the standpoint of the evolutionary history of life, Brown said the
discovery also "has shown that the cyanobacterial genes for cellulose
production are closely related to those genes in land plants. This strongly
suggests that the genetic code for the major building blocks for cellulose
production of land plants came directly from the cyanobacteria."

The researchers reviewed databases developed from recent gene sequencing
projects at in their lab at The University of Texas at Austin and throughout
the world looking for evidence of the presence of cellulose in diverse types
of cyanobacteria. No previous research has demonstrated biosynthesis taking
place in these types of microorganisms. The researchers used microscopy and
x-ray analysis to determine that cellulose was present in six strains of
five genera of blue-green algae. Brown said colloidal gold can be coupled
with an enzyme, cellubiohydrolase I as a tag. This enzyme specifically binds
to cellulose as it begins to degrade in nature.Thus, it is possible to
identify cellulose using this approach. Brown said gold labeling alone
indicated the presence of cellulose in four additional strains.

"The genetic analysis suggestions a close relationship between vascular
plants and cyanobacterial cellulose synthases," Nobles said.

For images, see:

http://www.botany.utexas.edu/facstaff/facpages/mbrown/cyano/

The manuscript can be downloaded at the following URL:

http://www.plantphysiol.org/cgi/content/full/127/2/529

((AScribe - The Public Interest Newswire / http://www.ascribe.org))


(C)1999-2001 Ascribe News - http://www.ascribe.org



Copyright © 2001, AScribe Newswire, all rights reserved.


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