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Asunto:[CeHuNews] 12/03 - ECUADOR: THE ANDES AND THE AMAZON FIELD SCHOOL
Fecha:Jueves, 13 de Febrero, 2003  19:33:26 (-0300)
Autor:Humboldt <humboldt @............ar>

 
CeHuNews12/03

ECUADOR:
THE ANDES AND THE AMAZON FIELD SCHOOL
Arizona State University Summer Program

1st Summer Session: June 8 - 30, 2003
2nd Summer Session: July 2 - 24, 2003

This program provides an interdisciplinary opportunity to study Quichua language and religious life, tropical plant biology, and/or Spanish while experiencing the rich culture of the Andes and Amazon.  A unique perspective is gained by living and working with indigenous communities.
Members of these communities serve as co-teachers in the courses.

LOCATION
Santo Urcu Amazonian Quichua Community on the banks of the Napo River, a tributary of the Amazon.  Here students are immersed in Quichua life.
You will camp in virgin rainforest, listen to the singing of ayahuasca shamans, clear forest with machetes to plant manioc, and much more.
Other Andean destinations include Quito, Papallacta, Banos, Salasaca, and the Cayambe/Otavalo region.

PROGRAM ITINERARY

- Session 1, June 8-30, 2003:

QUITO (June 8-9) - Visit the colonial city founded in 1534 to understand the Spanish conquest through indigenous eyes.

PAPALLACTA (June 10) - Soak in volcanic hot springs under towering mountains.

CANOA YACU AMAZONIAN QUICHUA COMMUNITY (June 10-26) - Live in an indigenous Quichua community on the banks of the Napo River, a tributary of the Amazon. Here students are immersed in Quichua life. You will camp
in virgin rainforest, listen to the singing of ayahuasca shamans, clear forest with machetes to plant manioc, and much more.

BANOS (June 26-27) - Ride horseback on the slopes of Mt. Tunguragua.

- Session 2, July 2-24, 2003:

QUITO (July 2-3) - Visit the colonial city founded in 1534 to understand the Spanish conquest through indigenous eyes.

PAPALLACTA (July 4) - Soak in volcanic hot springs under towering mountains.

SANTO URCU AMAZONIAN QUICHUA COMMUNITY (July 4-19) - Live in an indigenous Quichua community on the banks of the Napo River, a tributary of the Amazon. Here students are immersed in Quichua life. You will camp
in virgin rainforest, listen to the singing of ayahuasca shamans, clear forest with machetes to plant manioc, and much more.

BANOS (July 20-21) - Ride horseback on the slopes of
Mt. Tunguragua.

SALASACA ANDEAN QUICHUA COMMUNITY (July 22-23) - Observe a Salasaca medicine ceremony. Hike to a "huaca" (sacred site). Study the iconography of Salasaca weaving. Visit a Quichua school where volunteer teachers use quipuus to teach math to children.

ACADEMIC PROGRAM
All students enroll for seven credits each session including four in the Quichua or Spanish language and three from any of the other courses listed below.  The Quichua graduate program prepares students for serious research on indigenous culture.  It provides immersion in the Quichua language and practical training in contemporary field work methods.  Undergraduates may enroll in 300 or 400 level classes only.
Students taking the biology course "Tropical Plant Biology" will learn to recognize major families and genera of the Amazonian region by collecting, imaging, and identifying plant specimens as part of a plant diversity inventory of the Canoa Yacu Reserve.  Quichua shamans work with the class to compare biological classification with Amazonian ethnobotanical tradition.

Session 1: June 8-30, 2003
FLA 494/590: ST/RC: Beginning Quichua
FLA 494/590: Advanced Quichua (4)
SPA 101: Elementary Spanish (4)
SPA 201: Intermediate Spanish (4)
REL 332: South American Indian Religious Traditions (3)* ASB/REL
494/591: ST: Field Study of Andean/Amazonian Cultures I
(3)
PLB 498/598: Tropical Plant Biology (3)

Session 2: July 2-24, 2003
FLA 494/590: ST/RC: Beginning Quichua (4)
FLA 494/590: ST/RC: Intermediate Quichua (4)
FLA 494/590: ST/RC: Advanced Quichua (4)
SPA 102:  Elementary Spanish (4)
SPA 202:  Intermediate Spanish (4)
REL 305: Myth, Ritual, and Symbol: Amazon and Andes (3)** ASB/REL
494/591: ST: Field Study Andean/Amazonian Cultures II (3) IED/REL
494/591: ST: Teaching Indigenous Culture (3)

*Fulfills ASU General Studies requirements in: Humanities and Global.
**Fulfills ASU General Studies requirements in: Literacy and Humanities.

FELLOWSHIPS
This program is approved by the U.S. Department of Education for Graduate Summer FLAS Fellowships.  To qualify, FLAS Fellows must enroll in both sessions.  Four $1,000 Teacher Fellowships are also available for K-12 and community college teachers.  Teacher Fellowship applications are available on the program website.  The deadline for these is 03/07/03.

FACULTY
Professor Tod Swanson is Director of ASUs Center for Latin American Studies.  His specialty is Quichua religious history.  He was raised in the Ecuadorian Amazon and is fluent in Spanish and Quichua.  Dr. Leslie Landrum, Professor of Plant Biology, is a specialist in tropical plant classification.  Quichua instructors: Martina Masaquiza Chango de Moss, M.A., (Salasacan Quichua) and Luz Maria de la Torre Amaguana, M.A., (Otavalan Quichua).

LIVING ACCOMMODATIONS
Triple occupancy, thatched roofs, bamboo walls, and verandas while in the indigenous communities.  Hostels elsewhere.  American-style meals alternate with opportunities to sample native cuisine.

ELIGIBILITY
This program is open to adventurous students and alumni from any university willing to be challenged by the differences of indigenous culture.  To reserve a place in the program, submit a completed application form with the $350 ($50 non-refundable) application fee by April 5, 2003.  Applications will be accepted after due date until all spaces are filled.

COST OF PROGRAM
The cost of one session is $2,150.00 or $4,248.00 for both sessions (subject to change) includes tuition and fees, ground transportation in Ecuador, access to Indian communities and forests, lodging, and three meals a day.  Not included: airfare (approx. $775.00 with a group rate),
passport, health insurance, and personal expenses.

FOR MORE INFORMATION AND APPLICATION FORMS CONTACT:

Professor Tod Swanson
Center for Latin American Studies
Arizona State University
PO Box 872401
Tempe, AZ 85287-2401

Phone: (480) 965-5127
Fax: (480) 965-6679
E-mail: tod.swanson@asu.edu